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Kritika: Beckett

Although Beckett was the first English-language director of Greek-born Ferdinando Seto Filmarino, he has managed to earn two impressive contributors: Szakamoto Ryuchi for film music (The Returning, Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence!) and Luca Guadagnino for his duties as producer, Call for Your Name, sighs), the title character was no less than John David Washington, and his co-star was Tomb Raider star Alicia Vikander. However, the film, which mainly sparked the paranoid thrillers of the 70s and 80s (especially Roman Polanski’s madness in 1988), nevertheless managed to be ambiguous, after which we were still subtly expressing ourselves.

That’s what it’s about

While on vacation in Greece, Beckett (John David Washington) and partner April (Alicia Vikander) decide to hide in a less frequent part of Athens due to the protests raging in the city. However, as a result of a tragic incident, the title character gets swept up in the midst of events and has to flee, not by the way, before it’s too late, he has to find out exactly what he saw and why they want to catch him for that – all in a foreign country.

That’s why it’s good

One of the biggest strengths of Vilomarino’s direction is that the action scenes are realistic in every sense of the word and feel authentic. Finally, Washington’s character is not some kind of retired assassin or secret agent, but an ordinary guy, which is why he fights and runs the way we might in a similar situation. So these moments are more livable, not to mention that given the title character’s inexperience, we can’t for a moment feel like we’re witnessing a “progressive” showdown, and the tension rarely lasts.

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At the same time, the director had notably greater ambitions than work that lauded the paranoid thriller of the 1970s and 1980s: As playtime progressed, there were more and more references to the current Greek political crisis and the broader right. contradictions. The latter is primarily interpreted by the activist Vicki Krebs plays towards the viewer, and although these moments seem more and more educational as they progress toward the end, at first they are refreshing areas of action in the action-thriller.

That’s why it’s not good

John David Washington hasn’t been given a role since 2018 in Hoodies – BlacKkKlansman where he can show how talented he is as an actor (unless the budget is low, less attention is paid, Netflixes Malcolm and Marie also didn’t count here from the start of the year), and he didn’t make a good choice this Also the time: In nearly two hours of playing time, we know almost nothing about which Beckett played, which you can’t really push his escape. But the same can be said for all the other characters: each of them can be roughly described by two signs, and for this reason, it is also easy to deduce who will cheat who or what is his real role in the story.

The above problems cannot be addressed by the fact that Kevin A. It feels cramped and undeveloped: despite political struggles, personal tragedies, transnational paranoia, and more, none of the leads have been properly resolved, even if the background is completely unnecessary as game time progresses. For this reason, Beckett can easily criticize the viewer as an experience of schizophrenia, which, to put it mildly, does not even benefit him.

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Is it worth your money?

Ferdinando Cito Filomareno’s first English-language directorial debut between the two benches is literally a scholastic example of sitting under the bench: it has plenty of European natural-realist drama to serve as a paranoid Hitchcock movie, but feature film audiences will. You find it very prevalent and superficial. However, they have their best private moments, but unfortunately there is not enough of them to compete with the best content of the streaming provider. It’s a waste.


Beckett has been available on Netflix since August 13, 2021. You can browse all reviews published on IGN Hungary by clicking on our review summary.