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There will also be a special solar eclipse from Hungary

An annular eclipse means that even in full shadow range, the lunar disk cannot completely block the sun, but an amazing ring of light remains around the moon’s black edge. This is because the moon is located at a close distance and appears smaller than the solar disk, according to a report by the Svábhegy Observatory on Friday.

From Budapest, the moon covers only 8% of the sun’s diameter, so it will not be possible to notice the phenomenon with the naked eye. However, with telescopes, eclipse glasses or welding glasses, they will be well noticed.

An eclipse occurs when the moon is between the sun and the earth, so the moon casts a shadow over the earth.

A total solar eclipse, unlike a lunar eclipse, is only observed from a small part of the globe.

The current circular solar eclipse in its entirety is only seen in northern Canada, Greenland, then Siberia and the Far East. Hungary is now located at the outer limits of the partial regression region. While the disk of the moon from Budapest covers 8% of the sun’s diameter, and only 4% that of Szeged. The partial eclipse begins at 12 noon in Budapest, the maximum blackout will be at 12 noon 45, and the two celestial bodies will be permanently separated at 1:27 pm. There may be a few minutes of deviation from the rest of the country.

According to the advertisement, during the extreme blackout period, moon biting into the solar disk will also be visible to the naked eye, who wants to follow it, but it is worth getting a suitable sunscreen filter. In the case of open-eye observation, the eclipse goggles and visible sunscreens available in binoculars provide optimum protection, as do welding goggles, from DIN 12, they write.

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Astronomers warn that only devices that can be used to monitor solar energy can be used in specialized stores to monitor this phenomenon. Home remedies can damage eyesight.

Opening Image: MTI / EPA / Ritchie B. Tongo