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We can see up to four or five shooting stars an hour

The first major meteorite of the year, Lyrids, is April 14-30. Active, most meteors can be seen on the 21st and 22nd days. An unwanted meteor swarm formed from the debris from Comet Thatcher. The comet was discovered by astronomer AE Thatcher in the second half of the 19th century. However, Chinese astronomers have recorded Lyrians as early as 687.

The first major meteorite of the year, Lyrids, is April 14-30. Active, most meteors can be seen on the 21st and 22nd days. During those two days, seven to eight meteor stars may reach per hour from the direction of the constellation Lant (Lyra), which is called the Swarm. Lyrida Shooting stars are medium speed and may have brighter fireballs – It can be read in the National Geographic article.

Unfortunately, at the height of a meteor swarm, moonlight will be very strong as well, with 67 percent of the lighting significantly impairing the experience, so it’s good to see four to five meteors an hour.

But how do meteorites and meteor swarms form? When a comet arrives near the sun, the ice in it and the dust frozen in it are heated in the void of space and released during the change of state – from solid to vapor. Dust particles, that is, meteorites, rotate near the parent’s celestial body. These discarded clouds of material are called meteor swarms.

Lyrid meteor swarm in 2020 (Photo: Time Picture / Máté Bokodi)

An unwanted meteor swarm formed from the debris from Comet Thatcher. The comet was discovered by astronomer AE Thatcher in the second half of the 19th century. However

Chinese astronomers have recorded Lyrians as early as 687.

The meteorites spread along the orbit over time. However, the periodic comet throws another dense cloud off of itself every time it is close to the sun. Hence, a meteor swarm is a collection of very complex clouds of matter.

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Sure, the number of all known meteor swarms is over three hundred, but on an annual basis we can only enjoy 55 meteorite swarms, the most famous of which are Perseids, Lions, Quarters and Lerians.

Cover photo illustration.